Lastly, 4016 rage Respondent age Correlation Coefficient

Lastly, the crosstabulation analysis discovered that there
is a frail but noteworthy relationship (Cramer’s v=.225, p<.05) with the respondents who think that there are actively practising it. For those who answered no to there being a relationship with respondents and whether or not they are actively practicing is (63.4%), on the other hand, (36.6%) of the respondents claim that there is a similarity. As you can see from the survey, for those who are Christians disagree, (adj.res. =18.4). (74.3%) of Muslims answered yes and agreed that there is a relationship between religion and if they practise (adj.res. =16.9). The analysis shows that overall more respondents claim that they have no relationship between their religions and whether they are actively practising.   Interpretation       1.    Is there relationship between respondents' religion (religion) and whether they are actively practicing it (RelAct)?     Crosstabs 5.     The correlation analysis shown shows a significant relationship between those of their age and religion and national identity (r=1.p<0.05). There is a positive relationship so therefore this means that the respondent can approve there is conflict between the two religion and national identity.   Interpretation   Correlations   FeConf Ever feel there is a conflict between religion and national identity rage Respondent age Kendall's tau_b FeConf Ever feel there is a conflict between religion and national identity Correlation Coefficient 1.000 .191** Sig. (2-tailed) . .000 N 4018 4016 rage Respondent age Correlation Coefficient .191** 1.000 Sig. (2-tailed) .000 . N 4016 8771 **. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).     1.    What is the relationship between respondents' age (rage) and whether they ever feel there is a conflict between religion and national identity (FeConf)?   Nonparametric Correlations 4.       The results we received from Anova displays that different age groups fluctuate in their views on whether or not ethnic and religious groups should continue their duties and traditions (f=58. 865.p<.05) all the different age groups state that they should continue with their duties and traditions (mean=2.36). The results in the table show that out of all the groups that young adults are persuaded to believe that ethnic and religious groups ought to continue with their duties and traditions, (mean=2.07). Overall, the elderly claim that the duties and traditions should be continued within the religious groups (mean=2.63). Although, the difference shown are small, only the elderly and adults are persuaded to keep the traditions.   Interpretation   ANOVA ValS4 Different ethnic and religious groups should maintain their customs and traditions    Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Between Groups 146.187 2 73.093 58.856 .000 Within Groups 5444.541 4384 1.242     Total 5590.728 4386                                                     iii.    Elderly – 65 and over                                          ii.    Adults – from 30 – 64 years                                           i.    Young Adults – 29 years and younger ·         Recode respondents age (rage) into three categories:   Do respondents of different age groups differ in their perception on different ethnic and religious groups should maintain their customs and traditions (ValS4)?   One way 3.       Independent Samples Test     Levene's Test for Equality of Variances t-test for Equality of Means F Sig. t df Sig. (2-tailed) Mean Difference Std. Error Difference 95% Confidence Interval of the Difference Lower Upper ValS3 Different ethnic and religious groups should adapt and blend into the larger society Equal variances assumed 4.059 .044 2.207 3722 .027 .074 .033 .008 .139 Equal variances not assumed     2.164 2623.240 .031 .074 .034 .007 .141       Residents in England whom practise their religion were asked if the different ethic groups and religious groups should adapt and merge into a greater society. The t-test results show that there is a numerical substantial difference (t=2.207, p<.05) between who approves that the religious and different ethnic groups should merge into a bigger society. The respondents who responded yes to that different ethnics should merge and adapt into society comes in at a rate of (mean=1.88) and for those who answered no (mean=1.81). The results show that there is not much of a difference between those who answered yes compared to those who answered no (mean difference=.074).   Interpretation   Group Statistics   RelAct Actively practising your religion N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean ValS3 Different ethnic and religious groups should adapt and blend into the larger society 1 Yes 1343 1.88 1.024 .028 2 No 2381 1.81 .954 .020     Do respondents who practice religion (RelAct) differ from those who do not in their views on whether different ethnic and religious groups should adapt and blend into the larger society (ValS3)?   T-Test 2.               The outcome of this shows that the majority answered yes. 93.1% claimed that they feel they can practice their religion freely. On the other hand, 53 (2.9%) of the respondents answered "no" and expressed that they felt they could not practice their religion freely. 4.0% of the people answered that they could partly practice their religion. Also from this survey there is a big chunk missing. The survey only shows 1820 valid answers which means there's 3175 (63.6%) answers missing. The data which has been presented shows that in England females feel free to practise their religion but could show a different outcome if the mainstream of survey was not missing. A population of people whom live in England were asked if female respondents feel that they can practice their religion freely, as part of the citizenship data survey 2007. There were 4995 respondents who took part in this survey and only 36.4% gave a valid answer to the question   RelActF Able to practise your religion freely in Britain   Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Valid 1 Yes 1694 33.9 93.1 93.1 2 Partly 73 1.5 4.0 97.1 3 No 53 1.1 2.9 100.0 Total 1820 36.4 100.0   Missing -8 Don't Know 2 .0     -1 Item not applicable 3173 63.5     Total 3175 63.6     Total 4995 100.0         Statistics RelActF Able to practise your religion freely in Britain  N Valid 1820 Missing 3175 Mode 1   ·         Present frequency distribution table, appropriate measures of central tendency and present results graphically. 1.    Do female respondents feel they are able to practice their religion freely in Britain (RelActF).   Frequencies 1.